Writer forced to defend Sex on Campus article after critics claim that it makes young women ‘feel bad’ about emotion-free promiscuity

This is really what happens if you dare to raise your voice about the wrong doings of women. Allow them to do whatever they want to do, do not expect moral values, do not expect any logical thinking, just allow them to do whatever they want to do, the way they want to do. In my last post, I shared a story, published in New York Times, about sex on campus and how women are enjoying it. Link to that post is here: https://nomansland1.wordpress.com/2013/07/24/sex-on-campus-she-can-play-that-game-too/

Now this is not the most important part as we all more or less know the realities about one night stands and friends with benefit concepts. But after this particular post was published, the author of that post also had to defend her opinion, as a very strong voice was raised against her, stating that it would make young women feel bad !! I am wondering can it really get more funny than this. These so called modern ladies DO NOT FEEL BAD while doing it, but they will feel bad if you write about it !! Read on ..

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New York Times reporter Kate Taylor has defended her article Sex on Campus: She Can Play That Game, Too, and insists she is ‘surprised’ by the negative reaction it has received.

The story, which delves into female students’ feelings on relationships and casual sex at Penn University, has received nearly 800 concerned comments, some of which accuse the article of ‘misrepresenting’ women.

But in an interview with the New York Times’ Public Editor, Margaret Sullivan, Ms Taylor says: ‘I feel as if the readers who appear to have read the article carefully – which is important, because it has many layers, not reflected in the snappy headline – have had very thoughtful reactions.’

Dr Logan Levkoff, who graduated with two degrees from the University of Pennsylvania, asked in an essay for the Huffington Post: ‘Why did the author write this? Perhaps a provocative piece about Ivy League women and sex attracts New York Times readers.

‘But sadly,’ she continues, ‘it misrepresented the accomplished, strong and smart women that I know as Penn students, past and present.’

In a roundtable discussion on MSNBC’s Morning Joe, Cosmopolitan editor-in-chief Joanna Coles and Newsweek editor-in-chief Tina Brown, joined host Mika Brzezinski, as well as Ms Taylor herself, to discuss the article.

On the defense: New York Times reporter Kate Taylor has defended her article Sex on Campus: She Can Play That Game, Too,the negative reaction it has receivedOn the defense: New York Times reporter Kate Taylor has defended her article Sex on Campus: She Can Play That Game, TooMs Brzezinski described the piece, which looks at how traditional dating in college has been replaced by ‘hooking up,’ which women are now propelling, according to Ms Taylor, as ‘kinda rough’.

Casual flings: Sex on Campus looks at how traditional dating in college has been replaced by 'hooking up,' which women are now propelling, according to Ms TaylorCasual flings: Sex on Campus looks at how traditional dating in college has been replaced by ‘hooking up,’ which women are now propelling, according to Ms Taylor

‘They’re being made to feel bad,’ said Ms Brzezinski.

Ms Taylor, supporting her piece which she worked on for five months, exclusively, clarified that the hook-up culture she wrote about is ‘not everyone at every school.’

‘What I came away with,’ she continued, ‘is that this has been a profound social change that has happened over the past several decades.

”It misrepresents the accomplished, strong and smart women that I know as Penn students, past and present’

‘Things have really changed since the time when my mom was going to college, when women, even if they were going to college and they were a minority then, kind of expected to get married soon after college and if they were pursuing a career, they were not going to be the breadwinner.’

Many agree that the way women deal with their sexuality has indeed changed, but many believe this is not necessarily a bad thing. Instead, as Salon’s Anna North explains, Ms Taylor’s article is simply ‘intended to worry’ the audience reading it.

Dr LevkoffIt agrees, writing: ‘The author juxtaposed the conversation about women’s empowerment with one student’s experience of rape. I’m not sure what she was trying to say, but it left many people struggling with this strange notion that sexual assault was to be an expected outcome for this non-traditional sexual experimentation.

‘Let me just say this: “Hooking up” is nothing new and there is no way that rape should be expected outcome of anything. But that appears to be part of the author’s assertion.’

Hashing it out: In a roundtable discussion on MSNBC's Morning Joe, Cosmopolitan editor-in-chief Joanna Coles and Newsweek editor-in-chief Tina Brown, joined host Mika Brzezinski, as well as Ms Taylor herself, to discuss the articleHashing it out: In a discussion on MSNBC’s Morning Joe, Cosmopolitan editor-in-chief Joanna Coles and Newsweek editor-in-chief Tina Brown, joined host Mika Brzezinski, and Ms Taylor herself, to discuss the article
Points of view: Ms Coles, who took over as editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan 10 months ago, added that the thing 'missing' from Ms Taylor's story was an important 'sense of fun'Points of view: Ms Coles, who took over as editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan 10 months ago, added that the thing ‘missing’ from Ms Taylor’s story was an important ‘sense of fun’

Indeed, Tina Brown, whose daughter is a junior in college, said she was disbursed by the trend of ‘hooking-up’: ‘I found this tragic because it basically says that these girls are completely editing out tenderness, intimacy, excitement, somebody respecting them,’ she said.

Jezebel’s Kate Dries called the piece a ‘gross mis-categorization of all women’ that also ‘limits the voices of women who we read about in the news’.

There are no men, or gay and lesbian students quoted in the story – which is a criticism of many. As is the fact that Ms Taylor focused exclusively on one Ivy League university.

‘The story limits the voices of women who we read about in the news’

Ms Dries believes that that fact people are using Ms Taylor’s piece to talk about ‘how these poor girls can be saved’ is indicative of how the public is only given stories that portray women as ‘victims that are in trouble, that what they are doing is bad for them and for society.’

And Ms Coles, who took over as editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan 10 months ago, added that the thing ‘missing’ from Ms Taylor’s story was an important ‘sense of fun’.

‘You go to college to experiment sexually,’ said the mother-of-two. ‘I think [women] do want to get married but they don’t want to get married at college, or right out of college. So what do you do in between that time…?’

But according to Ms Sullivan, Ms Taylor’s piece ‘was fascinating and worthwhile,’ regardless.

‘Like many articles of this nature, which depend heavily on anecdotes and personal experience, this one can’t be seen as definitive, but as a snapshot that gets people talking and thinking,’ she said. ‘Unquestionably, it did that.’

Link to the original story: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2367412/Writer-forced-defend-Sex-Campus-article-critics-claim-makes-young-women-feel-bad-emotion-free-promiscuity.html?ito=feeds-newsxml

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